Joel Coen

(1954 – )
Biography from Baseline’s Encyclopedia of Film
Occupation: Director
Also: Screenwriter
Born: November 29, 1954, St. Louis Park, MN
Education:
Simon’s Rock of Bard College;
Institute of Film and TV, NYU

Working with his brother Ethan, screenwriter/director Joel Coen has built a reputation as one of the most visionary and idiosyncratic filmmakers of the late 20th century. Combining thoughtful eccentricity, wry humor, arch irony, and often brutal violence, the films of the Coen brothers have become synonymous with a style of filmmaking that pays tribute to classic American movie genres — especially film noir — while sustaining a firmly postmodern feel. Beginning with Blood Simple, their brutal, stylish 1984 debut, the brothers have amassed a body of work that has established them as two of the most compelling figures in American and world cinemas.

Born in St. Louis Park, MN, in 1954, Joel Coen studied at New York University before moving into filmmaking in the early ’80s. He and his younger brother began writing screenplays while Joel worked as an assistant editor on good friend Sam Raimi’s 1983 film The Evil Dead. In 1984, they made their debut with Blood Simple. Both of them wrote and edited the film (using the name Roderick Jaynes for the latter duty), while Joel took the directing credit and Ethan billed himself as the producer. It earned considerable critical acclaim and established the brothers as fresh, original talent. Their next major effort (after Crimewave, a 1985 film they wrote that was directed by Raimi), 1987’s Raising Arizona was a screwball comedy miles removed from the dark, violent content of their previous movie, and it won over critics and audiences alike. Their fan base growing, the Coens went on to make Miller’s Crossing (1990), a stark gangster epic with a strong performance from John Turturro, whom the brothers also used to great effect in their next film, Barton Fink (1991). Fink earned Joel a Best Director award and a Golden Palm at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival, as well as the festival’s Best Actor award for Turturro. A surreal, nightmarish movie revolving around a writer’s creative block, it was a heavily stylized, atmospheric triumph that further established the Coens as visionary arbiters of the bizarre.

Their 1994 follow-up to Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, was a relative critical and commercial disappointment, though it did boast the sort of heavily stylized, postmodern irony that had so endeared the brothers to their audience. Whatever failings The Hudsucker Proxy exhibited, however, were more than atoned for by the unquestionable success of the Coens’ next film, Fargo (1996). A black, violent crime comedy with a surprisingly warm heart, it recalled Blood Simple in its themes of greed, corruption, and murder, but provided more redemptive sentiment than was afforded to the characters of the previous film. The brothers shared a Best Original Screenplay Oscar for their work, and another Oscar, for Best Actress, went to Frances McDormand, to whom Joel had been married since 1984.

Following Fargo, the Coens went on to make The Big Lebowski in 1998. A blend of bungled crime and warped comedy, Lebowski was a laid-back, irreverent revision of the hardboiled L.A. detective genre. It met with mixed critical reception, though it did receive a Golden Bear nomination for Joel Coen at the Berlin Film Festival. The year 2000 brought the Coens into the depression-era with O Brother, Where art Thou? An admittedly loose adaptation of Homer’s The Odyssey, O Brother starred George Clooney, John Turturro, and Tim Blake Nelson as escaped convicts on a surreal journey through 1930s Mississippi. Wasting no time in production of their next feature, the following year found Joel the recipient of his third Best Director award at Cannes for the darkly comic, monochromatic post-noir The Man Who Wasn’t There. Starring Billy Bob Thornton as a humble, small-town barber who gets mixed up in a tangled web of blackmail and deceit, the moody atmosphere of The Man Who Wasn’t There eschewed the wacky antics of O Brother in favor of a darker, more moody tone that recalled such earlier Coen efforts as Blood Simple and Barton Fink.

Two years later, Joel and Ethan re-teamed with Clooney for Intolerable Cruelty, a film that represented their version of a ’30s screwball comedy. The film was noteworthy in that it was the first movie made by the brothers that did not originate with them; they rewrote a script that was already in existence. Joel and Ethan were also listed as executive producers on the 2003 Terry Zwigoff film Bad Santa, a story that came from one of their original ideas. 2004 saw the release of the Coens’ first remake, The Ladykillers starring Tom Hanks. That film also marked the first time Joel shared directorial credit with Ethan. — Rebecca Flint

Ethan CoenEthan Coen
(1957 – )
Biography from Baseline’s Encyclopedia of Film
Occupation: Producer
Also:  Screenwriter
Born: September 21, 1957, St. Louis Park, MN
Education:
Simon’s Rock of Bard College,
Massachusetts; Princeton University, NJ (philosophy)

Working alongside his brother Joel, Ethan Coen is widely considered one of the most visionary and idiosyncratic filmmakers of the late 20th century. Combining thoughtful eccentricity, wry humor, arch irony, and often brutal violence, the films of the Coen brothers have become synonymous with a style of filmmaking that pays tribute to classic American movie genres — especially film noir — while sustaining a firmly postmodern feel.

Born in St. Louis Park, MN, in 1957, Ethan Coen studied philosophy at Princeton University. Soon after he graduated, he and his brother began writing their first screenplays, and, in 1984, they made their debut with Blood Simple. Both of them wrote and edited the film (using the name Roderick Jaynes for the latter duty), while Joel took the directing credit and Ethan billed himself as the producer. It earned considerable critical acclaim and established the brothers as fresh, original talent. Their next major effort (after Crimewave, a 1985 film they wrote that was directed by Sam Raimi), 1987’s Raising Arizona was a screwball comedy miles removed from the dark, violent content of their previous movie, and it won over critics and audiences alike. Their fan base growing, the Coens went on to make Miller’s Crossing (1990), a stark gangster epic with a strong performance from John Turturro, whom the brothers also used to great effect in their next film, Barton Fink (1991). Fink earned Joel a Best Director award and a Golden Palm at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival, as well as the festival’s Best Actor award for Turturro. A surreal, nightmarish movie revolving around a writer’s creative block, it was a heavily stylized, atmospheric triumph that further established the Coens as visionary arbiters of the bizarre.

Their 1994 follow-up to Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, was a relative critical and commercial disappointment, though it did boast the sort of heavily stylized, postmodern irony that had so endeared the brothers to their audience. Whatever failings The Hudsucker Proxy exhibited, however, were more than atoned for by the unquestionable success of the Coens’ next film, Fargo (1996). A black, violent crime comedy with a surprisingly warm heart, it recalled Blood Simple in its themes of greed, corruption, and murder, but provided more redemptive sentiment than was afforded to the characters of the previous film. The brothers shared a Best Original Screenplay Oscar for their work, and another Oscar, for Best Actress, went to Frances McDormand, to whom Joel had been married since 1984. Following Fargo, the Coens went on to make The Big Lebowski in 1998. A blend of bungled crime and warped comedy, Lebowski was a laid-back, irreverent revision of the hardboiled L.A. detective genre. It met with mixed critical reception, though it did receive a Golden Bear nomination for Joel Coen at the Berlin Film Festival. In 1999, Ethan closed out the decade by publishing Gates of Eden, a collection of his short stories.

The Coens next served up the depression-era comedy O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), which turned out to be their biggest box-office success at that time and spawned a Grammy-winning soundtrack. 2001 saw the release of The Man Who Wasn’t There, yet another ode to film noir and another award winner at Cannes. In 2003, Ethan and Joel were credited as executive producers on Terry Zwigoff’s hit comedy Bad Santa largely due to the fact that the origin of the film’s story came from the Coens. That same year, the brothers re-teamed with George Clooney (one of the stars of O Brother) for the screwball comedy Intolerable Cruelty. In 2004, the duo released The Ladykillers starring Tom Hanks, a remake of the classic British comedy. The film marked the first time Ethan Coen officially shared the directing credit with Joel, as well as the first time they shared producer credit. — Rebecca Flint

 

Blood Simple

A bar-owner in Texas is certain that his wife is cheating on him and hires a private detective to spy on her. This is just the beginning of a complex plot which is full of misunderstandings and deceit.

I never thought I’d be saying something new about Blood Simple, but here it is. The Brothers put together a director’s cut. It screened early 2000 at the Sundance Film Festival. After the screening Joel and Ethan did a question and answer session. There’s a video tape of that somewhere and I’m trying to get my hands on it. So far, I believe it’s been released in Europe in some places(Germany) It will be released here in the states (NY/LA) July 7th, and expanding to other cities shortly there after, hopefully. The Coens do expect to have this new director’s cut released on DVD sometime after its theatrical re-release.
What do I know about the cut that is different? Well aparently the opening credits are different somehow. I’ve heard that there is an introduction reminisent of “Rocky Horror” with an unknown older man doing the talking. The only other thing I know for sure is that there’s a new stereo track. That’s all I know, what do you know? Let me know

A minimal budget of $1.5 million has ensured that Blood Simple is superbly streamlined, stripped to its essential characters. On the other hand, its stunning, evocative visuals belong in a film costing twice as much. Obviously the Coen brothers’ know where their priorities lie; they’re in the business of creating a compelling, slightly warped, vision which both uses and occasionally subverts the staples which prop up any particular genre. To this end, Blood Simple’s script is extremely tight with plenty of room for long silences, when warranted. The pace is beautifully controlled, glacial at first but invisibly picking up momentum until,suddenly, the film tightens its grip and squeezes.

~ Blood Simple-“When someone’s gone, they’re never gone for good!” Joel Coen,1984
~ Blood Simple won the Grand Jury Prize at the 1985 Sundance Film Festival.
~ When Blood Simple was first released, two quotes appeared over black, before the opening credits. One was from Dashiell Hammet explaining what Blood Simple meant and the second was from Alfred Hitchcock about how difficult it really would be to kill a man.
~ In the original release as well as the television version the Song “It’s the Same Old Song” by the Four Tops plays during the closing credits. In the current video release a country version of I’m a believer is played. You might recall it’s played in the movie. Does anyone know who sings this version and why it replaced “It’s the Same Old Song” let Me know.
~ The voice on the answering machine is Holly Hunter’s voice, mystery solved..

Coenesque

Trailer for FX’s Fargo Series

What to do next?

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Here’s a nice write up from ComingSoon.net speculating about what the Coen Brothers should do next.

Inside Llewyn Davis coming to DVD/Blu-Ray on March 21

The Coen Brothers latest release “Inside Llewyn Davis” is headed for Blu-Ray/DVD/Digital release on March 21st.  The disc will include a 40 minute making-of documentary featuring much of the cast and crew.  Seems fast to me but upon further study a 100 day turn around from theatrical to home release is not uncommon for the Joel and Ethan.

 

Film Theatrical Blu/DVD/Digital Days
Inside Llewyn Davis 12/6/2013 3/21/2014 105
True Grit 12/22/2010 6/7/2011 167
A Serious Man 10/2/2009 2/9/2010 130
Burn After Reading 9/12/2008 12/21/2008 100
No Country For Old Men 11/21/2007 3/11/2008 111
The Ladykillers 3/26/2004 9/7/2004 165
Intolerable Cruelty 10/10/2003 2/10/2004 123
The Man Who Wasn’t There 11/2/2001 10/1/2002 333
O Brother, Where Art Thou? 12/22/2000 6/12/2001 172
The Big Lebowski 3/6/1998 3/23/1999 382
Fargo 4/5/1996 3/4/1997 333
The Hudsucker Proxy 3/11/1994 ?
Barton Fink 8/21/1991 8/18/1993 728
Miller’s Crossing 10/5/1990 ?
Raising Arizona 3/13/1987 ?
Blood Simple. 1/18/1985 ?

 

Also set for release on 3/21/2014 is “Another Day/Another Time: Celebrating the Music of ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’” the concert that celebrated the music from the film.  This will only be released digitally and includes performances by the Avett Brothers, Joan Baez, Dave Rawlings Machine, Rhiannon Giddens, Lake Street Dive, Colin Meloy, The Milk Carton Kids, Marcus Mumford, Punch Brothers, Patti Smith, Willie Watson, Gillian Welch, and Jack White.

Inside Llewyn Davis Nominated for Two Oscars

 

Bruno_Delbonnel

Looks like Joel and Ethan’s latest got itself a couple of Oscar nods. Their new cinematographer, Bruno Delbonnel, has received his fourth Academy Award Nomination for his work behind the camera. Perhaps he’ll see his first win when the show airs March 2nd. The film was also nominated for Best Sound Mixing.

Inside Llewyn Davis

Joel and Ethan’s next directorial effort is “Inside Llewyn Davis.”  The story of a singer songwriter in the 1960’s New York Folk music scene.   It is loosely based on Dave Van Ronk’s posthumously published memoir The Mayor of MacDougal Street. It stars Oscar Isaac as Llewyn, Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake, John Goodman, and F. Murray Abraham.  Here is the first official trailer.

True GritUpcoming Projects

True Grit Full Length Trailer

 

TrailerTrue Grit

True Grit Trailer

TrailerTrue Grit

Barry Pepper Joins True Grit

barry-pepper

Barry Pepper is joining the cast of True Grit.  He will reprise the role of “Lucky” Ned Pepper a notorious outlaw.  “Lucky” was played by Robert Duvall in the 1969 version of the film.  Pepper is perhaps best known for his role as Private Daniel Jackson the crack sniper in Saving Private Ryan.

Barry Peppercasting callTrue Grit

Steven Spielberg Joins Forces With Coen Brothers?

Just looking at the IMDB.com entry for True Grit and I noticed a surprise producer.

Fargo

Jerry Lundegaard is in a financial jam and, out of desperation, comes up with a plan to hire someone to kidnap his wife and demand ransom from her wealthy father, to be secretly split between Jerry and the perpetrators. Jerry, who is not the most astute of individuals, hires a couple of real losers from the frozen northern reaches of Fargo, North Dakota to do the job. Then things begin to slip from bad to worse as Jerry helplessly watches on.

This movie has more character than any I’ve seen. You just love to see what happens next. The people are all so simple and they’ve gotten themselves into such a complicated web. Steve Buscemi is just great, he received one of the most unique bullet wounds I’ve ever seen. Its smart and just plain funny.

The claim at the beginning of the movie that the story it true is questionable. They wanted it to seem like something you would read in one of those true crime magazines. But it wasn’t something you would see on the local news. They added that just to, well I’m not exactly sure why they added that. But, I can say from my own experience that I believed the first time I saw it and it made it just a bit more interesting.

If you happened to read the credits, you would have seen a prince-like symbol in there O)+>. It was used as the actor for the second victom in the field. It wasn’t Prince it was just some guy from the crew. Another classic Coen joke. These are all the awards I know of. If you have heard about any others plese write to me at This address In the latest edition of the official Star Wars magazine (May/June 1999) an interview is printed with George Lucas he was asked what his opinion of today’s movies and he said “I think the quality of films is better than ever, quite frankly. Some of the films being made today are some of the best films ever made. And I think the films are more unique and more interesting. I definitely don’t go along with the critics’ idea that all we’re making is “popcorn” pictures today. Look at the films nominated for Academy Awards- they’re just as good today as they were 20 years ago, and some of them are much more esoteric and interesting. I would pick Fargo over The Sting for instance.”

Burn After Reading

Summary

Osbourne Cox (John Malkovich) is a CIA analyst who quits his job at the agency after being demoted ostensibly because of his drinking problem. He then decides to write a memoir about his life in the CIA. His wife, Katie Cox (Tilda Swinton), wants to divorce Osbourne and, at the counsel of her divorce lawyer, she copies many of his personal and financial files off his computer and onto an optical disc. Katie’s lover is Treasury agent Harry Pfarrer (George Clooney). The disc eventually finds its way to Hardbodies, a workout gym. An employee of the gym, Chad Feldheimer (Brad Pitt) obtains the disc from the gym’s custodian and ascertains that it contains classified government information. Along with his fellow employee Linda Litzke (Frances McDormand), he intends to use the disk to blackmail Osbourne – Linda needs the money to pay for cosmetic surgery. They call up Cox in the middle of the night, but he is not receptive. When blackmailing him fails, Linda decides to take the information to the Russian embassy. At the embassy, she hands the disk over to the Russians, promising that she will give more information afterwards. Because Linda and Chad don’t have any more information, they decide to break into Cox’s house.

By now Harry and Linda have met and begin seeing each other. Chad stakes out the Cox’s house and breaks in when Harry and Katie leave. Harry, however, comes back, finds Chad, and accidentally shoots him in the face. Harry, thinking that Chad was a spy, disposes of the body. Days later, his paranoia increasing after murdering Chad, Harry leaves the Cox residence after a fight with Katie. On his way to leave he manages to tackle a man who has been trailing him for some time, thinking he was working for the CIA or some other government agency. After tackling him, Harry finds out that the man is working for a divorce firm hired by his wife who, it is later revealed, also has been cheating on him. Harry is devastated and goes to see Linda.

The next morning, Harry and Linda meet in a park. When he realizes that Chad was Linda’s associate, he becomes paranoid and flees in terror.

Meanwhile, Osbourne returns to his home only to find himself locked out because Katie changed locks in a final move in her secret divorce proceedings. He sleeps overnight in his boat, and the next day breaks into his own house with a hatchet. There he finds Ted Treffon (Richard Jenkins), the manager of Hardbodies, rifling through his computer looking for personal information. Due to his feelings for Linda, Ted decided to look for more information to give to the Russians, believing that the Russians had kidnapped Chad. Osbourne shoots Ted, who survives and runs out of the house. Osbourne grabs the hatchet and kills Ted in broad daylight.

The movie ends by returning to the CIA’s headquarters, where an official (David Rasche) and his director (J.K. Simmons) are trying to sort out what happened: Chad is dead, Ted is dead, Osbourne is in a vegetative state and dying after being shot by an agent while attacking Ted, Harry has been arrested trying to board a flight to Venezuela (but the CIA wants to let him leave anyway so he’s out of their hair), and Linda has agreed to cooperate in exchange for the CIA financing her plastic surgery. The baffled CIA agents then decide that they have learned their lesson: to never repeat whatever it is that they did in this case; though they are still not clear what it is they did.

A Viewer’s Guide to Barton Fink

by David S. Cowen

SPOILERS AHEAD, kids

Barton Fink is a movie with complex symbolism, plot twists, hidden meanings, and a helluvalot of funny jokes. If you haven’t seen Barton Fink, or if you have only watched this once, this coming discussion will make the Barton Fink feeling much less exciting. So don’t read it if you haven’t seen it, OK? Much of Barton Fink can be explained by looking at the wallpaper. Yeah, the wallpaper. From the opening and closing credits, showing the wallpaper in its splendid beige beauty, it is one of the more important symbolic elements in the film.

1. So why does the wallpaper peel?

This is, for all intensive purposes, a symbolic joke. Both Barton and Charlie Meadows emotional states are represented by two of the elements: water and fire. The first time we catch wind of this (pun intended), Barton is entering the Hotel Earle. We see a shot of waves crashing against a large rock…and the water dissolves into the floor of the Hotel Earle, as though the brown carpeting were sand. Throughout the film, Barton looks at the picture of the girl — sitting by the water, and crashing waves come up in the soundtrack. Plus, the movie ends at the shoreline.

Charlie’s emotional fire symbology is a bit more apparent. It gets hotter and hotter all through the film as Charlie’s temper rises. At the high point of his anger, literally, flames erupt behind him. The man sweats — it’s HOT…water is purged from his body.

We know there are pipes behind the walls. This is one of the most important threads in the film — early on, when Charlie is talking about hearing the lovemaking couple Barton hears earlier, Barton leaves the room. Charlie cringes in sadness, and says “Seem like I hear everything in this dump. Must be the pipes or something.” When Barton comes back in, Charlie quickly hides his anger at having to be subjected to the sounds of lovemaking.

Later, Charlie hears lovemaking again. Barton starts yelling about W.P. Mayhew when Audrey comes over — which would have to wake up Charlie. When Audrey and Barton roll onto the bed (with a hilarious reference to the old film code that in a lovemaking scene, a man had to have at least one of his feet on the floor), the camera pans over and enters the bathroom. The sounds of Barton and Audrey are echoed by the pipe… the sound has carried over into the now-awake Charlie’s room.

When cold _water_ is carried through pipes in _hot_ weather, condensation forms on pipes — we all know that. If the pipe is directly behind wallpaper, the sweaty condensation gets through the wall into the wallpaper’s glue, loosens the glue, and the wallpaper peels. What a dump.

2. Why does Charlie kill?

Hotel Earle is hell — literally and figuratively. Water dissolves in it, Chet comes up from the underworld, the letter 6 is repeated in triplicate when Barton boards the elevator. “A day or a lifetime,” the stationary reads (notice, the pencil on the stationary has no lead. Not a good place to start writing, eh?)

Charlie Meadows is the hotel’s resident fallen angel. And I don’t use “fallen angel” in a sense of referring to big Satan himself, Charlie truly is a fallen angel in all senses of the word. All Charlie wants to do is help people, wants to keep people out of hell, keep them from the ways he feels. Notice, the man sells FIRE insurance. And hell yeah, he believes in it.

Most of the early parts of the film are spent with Charlie trying to help Barton. Despite being annoyed at Bartons noise complaint, Barton’s fake sympathy (“I thought you might be…in distress.”) makes Charlie think he might be an OK guy, that Barton could help fill some of the loneliness in his life. So, Charlie pines to be Barton’s muse. “I could tell ya some stories!” he says, offing to give Barton inspiration. Charlie demonstrates wrestling to Barton, seeing that Barton didn’t have a clue. “I’m not a mad man, Bart…I’m not mad at anyone. I just try to help people out. I just wish they’d do the same for me.”

And this doesn’t happen. Barton ignores Charlie, instead ranting about modern theatre, interrupting him any time he’s going to tell Barton something useful. Charlie gets ignored by everyone, or everyone is a hostile force in his life. “Opportunities galore,” he says, talking about his sexual exploits — but you know this isn’t true. The same housewives he talks about there are found murdered by the end of the film. Any sort of emotional contact with a woman is blocked by his weight (“that’s my cross to bear”), despite the fact that he has an interesting, lively personality. When he hears the “lovebirds” down the hall, this brings out a crushing pain in him about what he’ll never have.

But what brings out a worse pain is the night Barton and Audrey make love. Coupled with the pain of hearing the lovemaking, Charlie feels that Barton has abandoned him as his muse — Barton has instead chose Audrey as his muse, even though Charlie has a better, more genuine idea of what happens in a wrestling pictures.

In the end of the film, the way Charlie confronts Barton with this is brilliant. When Barton asks him why he killed Audrey, Charlie erupts “Because YOU DON’T LISTEN!” and the pus oozes out of his ear. In a way, this symbolizes graphically a sexual release for Charlie (much like killing Sport is a sexual release for Travis Bickle, in Taxi Driver). The wallpaper glue also probably represents sexual fluids. Charlie has given up hope. He’s trapped in hell for no reason, because all he’s ever tried to do was good, and gotten shit on. So he kills, to release the pain.

The Movies

Blood Simple

A rich but jealous man hires a private investigator to kill his cheating wife and her new man. But, when blood is involved, nothing is simple.
Purchase ©1984: John Getz, Frances McDormand, Dan Hedaya, M. Emmet Walsh, Samm-Art Williams

Raising Arizona

When a childless couple of an ex-con and an ex-cop decide to help themselves to one of another family’s quintupelets, their lives get more complicated than they anticipated.
Purchase ©1987: Nicolas Cage, Holly Hunter, Trey Wilson, John Goodman, William Forsythe

Miller’s Crossing

Tom Reagan, an advisor to a Prohibition-era crime boss, tries to keep the peace between warring mobs but gets caught in divided loyalties.
Purchase ©1990: Gabriel Byrne, Marcia Gay Harden, John Turturro, Jon Polito, J.E. Freeman

Barton Fink

In 1941, New York intellectual playwright Barton Fink comes to Hollywood to write a Wallace Beery wrestling picture. Staying in the eerie Hotel Earle, Barton develops severe writer’s block. His neighbor, jovial insurance salesman Charlie Meadows, tries to help, but Barton continues to struggle as a bizarre sequence of events distracts him even further from his task.
Purchase ©1991: John Turturro, John Goodman, Judy Davis, Michael Lerner, John Mahoney

The Hudsucker Proxy

A naive business graduate is installed as president of a manufacturing company as part of a stock scam.
Purchase ©1994: Tim Robbins, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Paul Newman, Charles Durning, John Mahoney

Fargo

Jerry Lundegaard’s inept crime falls apart due to his and his henchmen’s bungling and the persistent police work of pregnant Marge Gunderson.
Purchase ©1996: William H. Macy, Steve Buscemi, Peter Stormare, Kristin Rudrüd, Harve Presnell

The Big Lebowski

“Dude” Lebowski, mistaken for a millionaire Lebowski, seeks restitution for his ruined rug and enlists his bowling buddies to help get it.
Purchase ©1998: Jeff Bridges, John Goodman, Julianne Moore, Steve Buscemi, David Huddleston

O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Three stumblebum convicts escape to go on a quest for treasure and meet various characters while learning where their real fortune lies set in 1930s Deep South.
Purchase ©2000: George Clooney, John Turturro, Tim Blake Nelson, John Goodman, Holly Hunter

The Man Who Wasn’t There

A laconic, chain-smoking barber blackmails his wife’s boss and lover for money to invest in dry cleaning, but his plan goes terribly wrong.
Purchase ©2001: Billy Bob Thornton, Frances McDormand, Michael Badalucco, James Gandolfini, Katherine Borowitz

Intolerable Cruelty

A revenge-seeking gold digger marries a womanizing Beverly Hills lawyer with the intention of making a killing in the divorce.
Purchase ©2003: George Clooney, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Geoffrey Rush, Cedric the Entertainer, Edward Herrmann

The Ladykillers

An eccentric, if not charming Southern professor and his crew pose as a band in order to rob a casino, all under the nose of his unsuspecting landlord: a sharp old woman.
Purchase ©2004: Tom Hanks, Irma P. Hall, Marlon Wayans, J.K. Simmons, Tzi Ma

No Country for Old Men

Violence and mayhem ensue after a hunter stumbles upon some dead bodies, a stash of heroin and more than $2 million in cash near the Rio Grande.
Purchase ©2007: Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin, Javier Bardem, Woody Harrelson, Kelly Macdonald

Burn After Reading

Osbourne Cox, a Balkan expert, is fired at the CIA, so he begins a memoir. His wife wants a divorce and expects her lover, Harry, a philandering State Department marshal, to leave his wife. A diskette of Osbourne’s musings falls out of a gym bag at a Georgetown fitness center. Two employees there try to turn it into cash: Linda, who wants money for elective surgery, and Chad, an amiable goof. They try to sell the disc back to Osbourne, who has a short fuse, then they visit the Russian embassy. To sweeten the pot, they decide they need more of Osbourne’s secrets. Meanwhile, Linda’s boss likes her, and Harry’s wife leaves for a book tour. All roads lead to Osbourne’s house.
Purchase ©2008: George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Frances McDormand, John Malkovich, JK Simmons, Tilda Swinton

A Serious Man

Things start to unravel for Larry Gopnik. His wife, Judith, may be having an affair and wants a divorce. His brother, Arthur, lives with them because he is emotionally and financially incapable of living on his own.

Category Archives: Fargo

Category Archives: Fargo

Trailer for FX’s Fargo Series

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Billy Bob Thornton appears in this first trailer for the Coen Brother's executive produced FX Series.  Coming April 15th

Fargo on Blu-Ray

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Fargo is the 3rd Coen Brothers film to be released on Blu-Ray to date.  Not much new in the way of special features but who can resist a little 1080P action especially with Roger Deakins behind the camera.  It is available now, check it out on Amazon.

blu-rayFargoroger deakins

No Cannes for Coens

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It looks as though A Serious Man will not be ready in time for Cannes in May.  Various reports are saying that Joel and Ethan will not be taking their latest film to the Festival that has treated them so well in the past.

Of the Coen Brothers films 8 of 13 went to Cannes.  No Country for Old men, The Ladykillers, The Man Who Wasn’t There, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Fargo, The Hudsucker Proxy, Barton Fink, Raising Arizona all appeared at the most respected of film festivals.

bartonfink01 The Man Who Wasn’t There earned them the best director award in 2001.  Best Director was won again in 1996 with Fargo.  In 1991 Barton Fink turned in the best results with 3 wins.  The Palm d’Or the most prestigious prize, Best Director, and Best Actor for John Turturro.

With results like that it’s a shame they won’t make it back with A Serious Man. Maybe they’ll be at the Toronto film festival in September which is closer to the release date of October 2nd.

The Big Lebowski

Jeff Bridges charactor is refered to as “The Dude” as apposed to just “Dude.” Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski is stuck in the 60’s according to Bridges. The Dude is beaten up by two gangsters when he is mistaken for a wealthy civic leader of the same name whose wife owes money all over L.A. His bowling-team buddy (John Goodman) soon convinces him that he should be compensated, setting off a chain of events including a complex kidnapping plot

NOVEMBER 9TH IN SELECT THEATERS

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It is upon us, unprepared as always. For those of you in the chosen cities you’ll be seeing No Country For Old Men this Friday. I’ll be at the dentist. Hope you all enjoy.

7 THOUGHTS ON “NOVEMBER 9TH IN SELECT THEATERS”

  1. Anonymous

    i hardly ever go to the theater but this film was worth the 11 dollars. i commend the bros. for making a compelling movie. and mr mcarthy for the incredible writing. this is proof that hollywood can make a movie that uses violence to make a point. i dont have the faculties to make a poignant interpretation of the underlying meanings but rest as sure i will be pondering it.

  2. Koby Feldman

    Since you seem to be the top Coen Brothers site, I was hoping you could help me out. I’ve heard rumors that the Coen Brothers are planning on filming A Serious Man in their hometown of St. Louis Park, and are going to be looking for local people to be in the movie. I’m an actor, who has lived in St. Louis Park since I was 14. Do you know anything abotu this? You can e-mail me at KobyNumber9@hotmail.com

  3. Cent

    I’m writing from .Cent Magazine in London where No Country for Old Men will soon be out. To mark the occasion I am putting together a piece on the Coen brothers and as part of this I am looking for fans to write reviews of their favourite Coen movies, tracking the boys career through the voices of the fans. If you want to write for an international art and style magazine then drop me an email on dan@centmagazine.co.uk.

    Thanks,

    Dan
    Fashion Editor
    .Cent Magazine

  4. Mouths Of Dogs

    If you love this movie as much as the band Mouths Of Dogs did, you’ll love the song inspired by the movie, come listen to Dutchboy… I dare you.

    http://myspace.com/mouthsofdogs

    …Capture the Sun

  5. Kris Law

    anybody got the Coens brothers email add? if you do, pls email me at krislawfanclub@gmail.com

  6. Juanita’s Journal

    Congratulations to Ethan and Joel Coen for winning Best Director and Best Picture.

  7. fernando

    spanish citizen
    coen´s at its best
    a metaphor of the violent country you got there
    besides, stunnign performance of spanish actor bardem
    you should watch all coen´s and bardem´s films
    excuse my shitty english
    let´s see your spanish

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