No Country for Old Men

NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN is a mesmerizing new thriller from Academy Award®-winning filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen, based on the acclaimed novel by Pulitzer Prize-winning American master, Cormac McCarthy. The time is our own, when rustlers have given way to drug-runners and small towns have become free-fire zones. Featuring a cast that includes Academy Award®-winner Tommy Lee Jones (THE FUGITIVE, MEN IN BLACK), Josh Brolin (GRINDHOUSE), Academy Award®-nominee Javier Bardem (THE SEA INSIDE), Academy Award®-nominee Woody Harrelson (THE PEOPLE VS. LARRY FLYNT) and Kelly Macdonald (TRAINSPOTTING), NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN is written for the screen and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, produced by Scott Rudin, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, and executive produced by Robert Graf and Mark Roybal.

A movie can be based on various plots -Horror, comedy, romance etc.  Sometimes these are imaginary stories.  Sometimes these are based on true incidents.  Do not restrict yourself to only watching a particular type of movies.  You will lose the pleasure of watching the other types.  Movies based on wars and horrors strengthen our mind.  These prepare us to face adversities in life.  By watching these movies, you will start finding positivity in real life troubles.

Also, people love watching only the latest movies.  It is not desirable to totally ignore yester-year movies.  It would be very interesting to watch how people managed to live in years when there was no internet, mobile phones, video games etc.  You would be surprised how simple and primitive life was even ten years before.  You can get lots of inspiration from them.  You can feel how people were thinking fifteen years before. Why not try these out.  It will open your mindset.  While choosing a movie ignore the year it is made.  Let it be a short film or a full movie.

Back to ‘No Country for Old Men’.

The story begins when Llewelyn Moss (BROLIN) finds a pickup truck surrounded by a sentry of dead men. A load of heroin and two million dollars in cash are still in the back. When Moss takes the money, he sets off a chain reaction of catastrophic violence that not even the law – in the person of aging, disillusioned Sheriff Bell (JONES) – can contain. As Moss tries to evade his pursuers – in particular a mysterious mastermind who flips coins for human lives (BARDEM) – the film simultaneously strips down the American crime drama and broadens its concerns to encompass themes as ancient as the Bible, and as bloodily contemporary as this morning’s headlines.

The Ladykillers

The Ladykillers marks the Coen Brothers first collaboration with Box Office Giant Tom Hanks. In this remake of the 1955 classic the Coen’s once again stray from their habit of directing only original material.

Stop a second.  Have you ever wondered how movies are selected for award nominations? Sneak a peek at this website to know more.

The process of selecting a movie for an award nomination is a lengthy one.

  1. The actor/actress who is nominated for their roles must not have dubbed the dialogues for their roles. This rule is not applicable to the dubbed songs.
  2. For animated movies, any technique like pixilation, hand-drawn animation etc. are generally accepted. But real-time puppetry and motion capture techniques are not eligible as ‘animation’.
  3. The entries have to be submitted by the Producer as per norms laid by each academy.
  4. Subtitles have to be provided in English for other language movies.
  5. These academies have a voting panel of privileged and renowned people from various fields. Generally, the juries are from a variety of fields to ensure proper assessment.
  6. Besides movies, these academies invite entries of documents on subjects of social and economic importance.
  7. These academies do not compromise on the originality of the movie and music.
  8. They encourage scientific and technical innovative use in film making

 

We can understand that a movie has to meet so many conditions for satisfying the eligibility criteria.  Even a slight deviation can render the work ineligible.  So much hard work and creativity are required to make a movie.  Huge money is invested.   Piracy makes the investment irrecoverable.  Hence as fans, it is the duty on your part to stop watching hacked/pirated film content.  You may think that it is an advantage to watch it for free.  But imagine how painful it will be for the creators who shed so much of sweat in making the movie.  What is a cost-free pleasure for the viewer, will be the pain for the original maker.  We do not know whether the websites which provide pirated content are safe for our use.    The only solution to stop piracy is to spread awareness among fans that by watching pirated movie DVDs we are killing the creativity of the team that originally made the movie.  The second one is to improve the technology.  People hire experts who can kill the links on the internet which stream the pirated movies.  But it is a tough job.  Back to the ladykillers.

Hanks stars as Goldthwait Higginson Dorr III, Ph.D., a charlatan professor who’s assembled a gang of “experts” for the heist of the century.

Intolerable Cruelty

Ethan Coen and Joel Coen are very versatile directors and every time they come up with a refreshing plot and engaging screenplay. The romantic comedy, ‘Intolerable Cruelty’ was released worldwide in October 2003. Directed by Joel and written by Coen brothers, Mathew Stone, and Robert Ramsey, the film was a blockbuster hit. The lead role was performed by the century’s greatest actor in Hollywood, George Cooney brilliantly. We should say that he lived as Miles Massey than just acting! The other cast and the crew also did their role flawlessly. The movie was hilarious and precise in a way that only Coen brothers can pull off. There was beautiful chemistry between George and Catherine (female lead). The film has every element to drag the crowd, especially the youngsters adored the film for its hot sex elements, romantic scenes, and soulful songs. No wonder that the film made a humongous $120 million box office collection.

Even though the movie acquired a lot of positive reviews, it was considered as Coen brother’s weakly scripted film! The notable review page, ‘Rotten Tomato’ certified the film as fresh and gave a score of 75%. Continue to read this article to know the cast in detail and the abstract of the story.

Miles Massey, a prominent Los Angeles divorce attorney has everything–and in some cases, two of everything. Despite his impressive client list, a formidable win record, the respect of his peers and an ironclad contract (the Massey pre-nup) named after him, he’s reached a crossroads in his life. Sated on success, boredom has set in and he’s looking for new challenges. All that changes when Miles meets his match in the devastating Marylin Rexroth. Marylin is the soon-to-be ex-wife of his client Rex Rexroth, a wealthy real estate developer and habitual philanderer. With the help of hard charging private investigator Gus Petch, she has Rex nailed and is looking forward to the financial independence a successful divorce will bring. But thanks to Miles’ considerable skills, she ends up with nothing. Not to be outdone, Marylin schemes to get even and as part of her plan, quickly marries oil tycoon Howard Doyle. Miles and his unflappable associate, Wrigley, unwittingly dig themselves in deeper and deeper as they go head-to-head with Marylin. Underhanded tactics, deceptions and an undeniable attraction escalate as Marylin and Miles square off in this classic battle of the sexes.

A Coen Brothers Montage

Someone spent a fair amount of time putting together this montage of music and scenes from all the Coen Brothers films up through No Country For Old Men.  

‘No country for old men’ is one of the most celebrated films of Coen brothers. Released in 2007, the American thriller featured in the prestigious Cannes film festival. The film is an inspiration from the 2005 novel of McCarthy, who is also the screenplay writer of the movie. The movie talks about the inevitability of time, the generation gap and the inability of the older generation to change. ‘Money’ is actually the lead role in the movie. Here is the outline of the plot.

The hitman Anton Chigurh (Javier Bardem) who escapes the police custody loses his $2 million, which was earned illegally. Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin), who was upset over a broken drug deal happened to see the money. He takes it and ran to his house without knowing that an electronic chip is present inside the briefcase which can exactly track the location of the money. Chigurh comes in search of Moss and money and ends up with disappointment.

Meanwhile, the Sheriff, Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones) tries to get hold of the two accused. He is a soon to be retired old man who finally gives up fighting the odds of the society. Bell is a highly ethical person, still, he could succeed in his mission because of his age-old strategies and ideologies. Actually, his character signifies the title.

Anton Chigurh is a man without any ethics and values. His only objective is to make money. He gambles, trades using BTCProfit and illegally too, smuggle gun and drug and so on. He strikes everything that comes in his way. Whereas Llewelyn Moss’s character is made in a way that he always dwells between ethics and immorality, good and bad!

Every character was carefully and uniquely scripted and the artists also did justice to the roles offered. Finally, everyone would be dead!

Awards Won:

  • Believe it or not, the film has won a huge count of 76 awards across the Globe.
  • The proudest, prestigious award one can ever own is Oscars or the Academy Awards. The movie won 4 Academy awards!
  • 3 BAFTA awards.
  • The American Film Institute declared the film as ‘the movie of the year’ in 2007.

Worth a look.

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Archive for ‘A Serious Man’

Own a piece of A Serious Man

Larry Gopnik’s 1966 DODGE CORONET is being auctioned off for charity.  The auction will benifit Variety – The Children’s Charity of Southern California.  After 8 bids and with 6 days to go it’s at $5000.  A steal if your interested in extremely dull cars used in extremely great movies.  Auction | Charity

Coen Brothers Mop up at Cinephile Society Awards

Even though I’ve never heard of the International Cinephile Society I thought I’d report on the outcome of their 2009 awards since A Serious Man won their Best Film prize.  They also won in the directing and original screenplay categories.  The “ICS” was formed in 2003 and is made up of 60 journalists, scholars, and […]

A Serious Graduate

In the upcoming A Serious Man there were 3 actors plucked from casting calls in Minnesota where the film was shot and takes place.  Jessica McManus was one of them and she plays Sarah Gopnik daughter of Larry Gopnik our “Serious Man”.  Seventeen at the time she’s now graduated from High School and is heading […]

Carter Burwell receives career achievement award

ASCAP has bestowed the honor of the Henry Mancini Award in recognition of his outstanding achievements and contributions to the world of film music.  Joel and Ethan Coen sent a congratulatory video for the event which took place May 11th.  Burwell has scored every Coen Brothers film except O Brother, Where Art Thou? Since they […]

Cannes Line-up Announced

      The 2009 Cannes line-up has been announced and as suspected the Coen Brothers are missing.  Another Cannes favorite, Tarantino, will probably steal the show with Inglorious Basterds.  Check out the full list over at Empire.

No Cannes for Coens

It looks as though A Serious Man will not be ready in time for Cannes in May.  Various reports are saying that Joel and Ethan will not be taking their latest film to the Festival that has treated them so well in the past.  Of the Coen Brothers films 8 of 13 went to Cannes.  […]

A Serious Man Release Date

Just confirmed that A Serious Man will have a US limited release date of October 2nd, 2009.

Directed and written by Ethan and Joel, the film has created a huge expectation. Read this to unveil the storyline. The story revolves around the physics teacher, Larry Gopnik, whose life starts to sink all of sudden over a series of unfortunate incidents and how he unravels the twists and turns.

After A Serious Man and The Yiddish Policemen’s Union comes… True Grit???

London’s Daily Mail is reporting that The Coen Brother’s next, next project will be a recreation of the John Wayne classic True Grit. Not necessarily a remake, perhaps more of a retelling of Charles Portis’ 1968 novel.  Full Story

Continuing our look at the cast of “A Serious Man”

George Wyner is an actor a lot like Adam Arkin and Richard Kind. He’s done a great deal of television work including Hill Street Blues, Doogie Howser, and LA Law. He’s also had a few notable Film appearances in Spaceballs and Fletch. In A Serious Man he plays Rabbi Natcher one of the 3 rabbi’s […]

A Look at the cast of “A Serious Man” part 3

Michael Stuhlbarg is set to play Larry Gopnik the lead character in A Serious Man. Gopnik is a professor who’s life begins to unravel after his wife leaves him and his brother (Kind) won’t move out of his house. Stuhlbarg is a Tony-nominated actor who’s done some TV and film work to this point.

Welcome to Coenesque

Joel and Ethan Coen have been making films for over 25 years. From their debut “Blood Simple” in 1984 to the critically acclaimed “Barton Fink” and “Fargo”. To box office winners “Raising Arizona” and “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” to the cult classic “The Big Lebowski”. Their latest project “A Serious Man” is due out later this year. Despite their diverse films and audiences The Coens Brothers have managed to stay independent the entire time. They have Gained the respect of Hollywood and become filmmakers that everyone wants to work with.

Once while interviewing them, they were asked about choosing a specific movie which they could opt to live in. Then Joel wisely replied, we are happy with our present Crypto Code life. Moreover, the films we have made till now are bold in its own style. We do not want to interfere and let these live independently. Neither, none of our movies can be compared to our real life nor it has any such similar incidents that occurred in our lives.

Also, when both were inquired about the plots that suit their personality, they simply smiled and replied, we are aging that makes us to slowly fade away.

This is an unoffical fansite. I cannot provide you with information on where to send your great american screenplay or how to get in touch with them or their representives. I can, however, provide you with the latest information on what they’re currently up to and what they’ve managed to do so far. We have a forum where lively discussion is always going on and a store where you can find movie posters, DVDs, and sountracks. Whether you’re looking for scripts, pics, or just facts you’ve come to the right place.

If you have any questions or comments please email them to me webmaster@coenbrothers.net

About Me:

I’m just a guy who enjoys movies, especially those of the Coen Brothers. I’ve been managing this site on and off for 13 years now. I got started when I saw Fargo and thought it was the greatest thing I’d ever seen. It helped that I’m from Minnesota and thought it was pretty cool to see where I grew up on the big screen.

I occaisionally send out a newsletter to anyone who’d like to sign up. Usually just big news that I want to get out there fast.

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Miller’s Crossing

Summary

Millers Crossing stars Gabriel Byrne, four-time Academy Award nominee Albert Finney, Marcia Gay Harden, John Turturro, Jon Polito and J.E. Freeman. Set in 1929 in an unnamed Eastern city, it’s the compelling story of the friendship between Leo (Finney), the local political boss, and Tom (Byrne), the man behind the man.

While watching these fantastic movies, have you ever thought of the technical aspects which help these movies to achieve perfection.  Technology has made movie-watching a blissful experience.  Why not look here for the details you were eager to know for years?

  1. Sound: Latest sound technology used in movies give a crystal clear hearing experience for the viewers.  You feel as though it is happening very near you.  Latest concepts like Dolby Atmos, Auro3D etc. gives the same sound experience whether you are watching from the first row or the last.
  2. Light: Technology has enabled extensive research on lighting concepts.  There are various types of lighting like Soft light, High key light, and soft light.  Using the correct type of lighting depends on the characters and the mood of a particular scene shot.  Technology has enabled recording with clarity using the available natural lighting.
  3. Graphics: Graphics has made giant progress.  From the usage of simple morphing, the concept of graphics has resulted in 4D animation.  Graphics add richness to a movie.  It thrills the viewer using unimaginable technology.
  4. Camera: Now film making has leaped to the usage of drone cameras.  Next time when you gasp at those remarkable aerial views, thank these cameras.  Technology goes on improving the pixels.  The clarity and potential to capture minute details has become easy and a wide range of options are available.
  5. Protection: You dream to watch the movie first day first show at your favorite theatre.  Alas! That is already streamed on those hacking sites.  But technology is striving continuously to protect the rights of the original movie makers.  There is advanced software which can easily prevent hacking by creating a counter virus in the system.

Back to the story of Miller’s crossing.

Their friendship is severed when Leo and Tom fall in love with the same woman. Tom joins ranks with Johnny Caspar, Leo’s foremost enemy and rival for political power, and a bloody gang war erupts. For a better perspective on the movie, read Dashiell Hammett’s “The Glass Key”: much of the film’s brilliant dialogue is directly from the Novel.

The Man Who Wasn’t There

1949, Santa Rosa, California. A laconic, chain-smoking barber with fallen arches tells a story of a man trying to escape a humdrum life. It’s a tale of suspected adultery, blackmail, foul play, death, Sacramento city slickers, racial slurs, invented war heroics, shaved legs, a gamine piano player, aliens, and Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle.

Before you go into the detailed story- have you ever thought about how movies have emerged as a successful form of entertainment.  It is a long story.  Why not find out more?

Before movies came, people had to kill boredom with dramas and magic shows.  We do not have a clear history to trace the origin of film making.  However, it starts with the screening of commercials created by the Lumiere brothers in 1895.    Before this, the movies were just a minute long.  But Lumiere brothers pioneered the creation of motion pictures.

Soon this resulted in the creation of longer motion pictures with recorded sound.  The building of studios started in 1897.  In early 1900, various technical concepts like shooting successive shots, close-up shots etc. were introduced.  In 1905, a permanent theatre called ‘The Nickelodeon” was built to play movies.  From the year 1910, American movies grew popular in Australia and Europe.

Improvements in various fields of moviemaking like- Artificial and low-key lighting were introduced during this stage.  In the 1920s, the United States started producing an average of 800 films per year.  From then on there was no looking back. In late 1920s various technological development in sound recording came into practice.

The world war II resulted in increased popularity of movies.  Many movies were created based on war-time stories.  In the 1950s there was a slight set back due to the introduction of television.  Few theatres had to be closed because of bankruptcy.  But the setback was temporary.  Nothing could match the experience of watching movies.  So, film making was once again blooming.  Many academies and organizations offered patronage to movies of non-English languages also.   Slowly film making has reached the current stage.  Back to the story of the Man who wasn’t there.

Ed Crane cuts hair in his in-law’s shop; his wife drinks and may be having an affair with her boss, Big Dave, who has $10,000 to invest in a second department store. Ed gets wind of a chance to make money in dry cleaning. Blackmail and investment are his opportunity to be more than a man no one notices. Settle in the chair and listen.

Joel Coen

(1954 – )
Biography from Baseline’s Encyclopedia of Film
Occupation: Director
Also: Screenwriter
Born: November 29, 1954, St. Louis Park, MN
Education:
Simon’s Rock of Bard College;
Institute of Film and TV, NYU

Working with his brother Ethan, screenwriter/director Joel Coen has built a reputation as one of the most visionary and idiosyncratic filmmakers of the late 20th century. Combining thoughtful eccentricity, wry humor, arch irony, and often brutal violence, the films of the Coen brothers have become synonymous with a style of filmmaking that pays tribute to classic American movie genres — especially film noir — while sustaining a firmly postmodern feel. Beginning with Blood Simple, their brutal, stylish 1984 debut, the brothers have amassed a body of work that has established them as two of the most compelling figures in American and world cinemas.

Born in St. Louis Park, MN, in 1954, Joel Coen studied at New York University before moving into filmmaking in the early ’80s. He and his younger brother began writing screenplays while Joel worked as an assistant editor on good friend Sam Raimi’s 1983 film The Evil Dead. In 1984, they made their debut with Blood Simple. Both of them wrote and edited the film (using the name Roderick Jaynes for the latter duty), while Joel took the directing credit and Ethan billed himself as the producer. It earned considerable critical acclaim and established the brothers as fresh, original talent. Their next major effort (after Crimewave, a 1985 film they wrote that was directed by Raimi), 1987’s Raising Arizona was a screwball comedy miles removed from the dark, violent content of their previous movie, and it won over critics and audiences alike. Their fan base growing, the Coens went on to make Miller’s Crossing (1990), a stark gangster epic with a strong performance from John Turturro, whom the brothers also used to great effect in their next film, Barton Fink (1991). Fink earned Joel a Best Director award and a Golden Palm at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival, as well as the festival’s Best Actor award for Turturro. A surreal, nightmarish movie revolving around a writer’s creative block, it was a heavily stylized, atmospheric triumph that further established the Coens as visionary arbiters of the bizarre.

Their 1994 follow-up to Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, was a relative critical and commercial disappointment, though it did boast the sort of heavily stylized, postmodern irony that had so endeared the brothers to their audience. Whatever failings The Hudsucker Proxy exhibited, however, were more than atoned for by the unquestionable success of the Coens’ next film, Fargo (1996). A black, violent crime comedy with a surprisingly warm heart, it recalled Blood Simple in its themes of greed, corruption, and murder, but provided more redemptive sentiment than was afforded to the characters of the previous film. The brothers shared a Best Original Screenplay Oscar for their work, and another Oscar, for Best Actress, went to Frances McDormand, to whom Joel had been married since 1984.

Following Fargo, the Coens went on to make The Big Lebowski in 1998. A blend of bungled crime and warped comedy, Lebowski was a laid-back, irreverent revision of the hardboiled L.A. detective genre. It met with mixed critical reception, though it did receive a Golden Bear nomination for Joel Coen at the Berlin Film Festival. The year 2000 brought the Coens into the depression-era with O Brother, Where art Thou? An admittedly loose adaptation of Homer’s The Odyssey, O Brother starred George Clooney, John Turturro, and Tim Blake Nelson as escaped convicts on a surreal journey through 1930s Mississippi. Wasting no time in production of their next feature, the following year found Joel the recipient of his third Best Director award at Cannes for the darkly comic, monochromatic post-noir The Man Who Wasn’t There. Starring Billy Bob Thornton as a humble, small-town barber who gets mixed up in a tangled web of blackmail and deceit, the moody atmosphere of The Man Who Wasn’t There eschewed the wacky antics of O Brother in favor of a darker, more moody tone that recalled such earlier Coen efforts as Blood Simple and Barton Fink.

Two years later, Joel and Ethan re-teamed with Clooney for Intolerable Cruelty, a film that represented their version of a ’30s screwball comedy. The film was noteworthy in that it was the first movie made by the brothers that did not originate with them; they rewrote a script that was already in existence. Joel and Ethan were also listed as executive producers on the 2003 Terry Zwigoff film Bad Santa, a story that came from one of their original ideas. 2004 saw the release of the Coens’ first remake, The Ladykillers starring Tom Hanks. That film also marked the first time Joel shared directorial credit with Ethan. — Rebecca Flint

Ethan CoenEthan Coen
(1957 – )
Biography from Baseline’s Encyclopedia of Film
Occupation: Producer
Also:  Screenwriter
Born: September 21, 1957, St. Louis Park, MN
Education:
Simon’s Rock of Bard College,
Massachusetts; Princeton University, NJ (philosophy)

Working alongside his brother Joel, Ethan Coen is widely considered one of the most visionary and idiosyncratic filmmakers of the late 20th century. Combining thoughtful eccentricity, wry humor, arch irony, and often brutal violence, the films of the Coen brothers have become synonymous with a style of filmmaking that pays tribute to classic American movie genres — especially film noir — while sustaining a firmly postmodern feel.

Born in St. Louis Park, MN, in 1957, Ethan Coen studied philosophy at Princeton University. Soon after he graduated, he and his brother began writing their first screenplays, and, in 1984, they made their debut with Blood Simple. Both of them wrote and edited the film (using the name Roderick Jaynes for the latter duty), while Joel took the directing credit and Ethan billed himself as the producer. It earned considerable critical acclaim and established the brothers as fresh, original talent. Their next major effort (after Crimewave, a 1985 film they wrote that was directed by Sam Raimi), 1987’s Raising Arizona was a screwball comedy miles removed from the dark, violent content of their previous movie, and it won over critics and audiences alike. Their fan base growing, the Coens went on to make Miller’s Crossing (1990), a stark gangster epic with a strong performance from John Turturro, whom the brothers also used to great effect in their next film, Barton Fink (1991). Fink earned Joel a Best Director award and a Golden Palm at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival, as well as the festival’s Best Actor award for Turturro. A surreal, nightmarish movie revolving around a writer’s creative block, it was a heavily stylized, atmospheric triumph that further established the Coens as visionary arbiters of the bizarre.

Their 1994 follow-up to Barton Fink, The Hudsucker Proxy, was a relative critical and commercial disappointment, though it did boast the sort of heavily stylized, postmodern irony that had so endeared the brothers to their audience. Whatever failings The Hudsucker Proxy exhibited, however, were more than atoned for by the unquestionable success of the Coens’ next film, Fargo (1996). A black, violent crime comedy with a surprisingly warm heart, it recalled Blood Simple in its themes of greed, corruption, and murder, but provided more redemptive sentiment than was afforded to the characters of the previous film. The brothers shared a Best Original Screenplay Oscar for their work, and another Oscar, for Best Actress, went to Frances McDormand, to whom Joel had been married since 1984. Following Fargo, the Coens went on to make The Big Lebowski in 1998. A blend of bungled crime and warped comedy, Lebowski was a laid-back, irreverent revision of the hardboiled L.A. detective genre. It met with mixed critical reception, though it did receive a Golden Bear nomination for Joel Coen at the Berlin Film Festival. In 1999, Ethan closed out the decade by publishing Gates of Eden, a collection of his short stories.

The Coens next served up the depression-era comedy O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), which turned out to be their biggest box-office success at that time and spawned a Grammy-winning soundtrack. 2001 saw the release of The Man Who Wasn’t There, yet another ode to film noir and another award winner at Cannes. In 2003, Ethan and Joel were credited as executive producers on Terry Zwigoff’s hit comedy Bad Santa largely due to the fact that the origin of the film’s story came from the Coens. That same year, the brothers re-teamed with George Clooney (one of the stars of O Brother) for the screwball comedy Intolerable Cruelty. In 2004, the duo released The Ladykillers starring Tom Hanks, a remake of the classic British comedy. The film marked the first time Ethan Coen officially shared the directing credit with Joel, as well as the first time they shared producer credit. — Rebecca Flint

Toronto gets A Serious Man World Premiere

The Toronto International Film Festival announced today that the Coen Brothers new film A Serious Man will be premiering there.  The festival begins September 10th less than a month before the official US release date.

In one of their recent interviews, the Coen brothers revealed the sneak peek of their upcoming film, ‘A serious man’. The film revolves around a physics professor, Larry Gopnik, who suddenly encounters a series of unfortunate events. When he starts looking for ways to unravel the incidents, he finds a shocking coincidence between the events and finally, the truth would be revealed. Coen Brothers reveal that it is a period film, dating back to 1967. This time they have come up with the black comedy genre.

Ethan Coen and Joel Coen are equally excited like his audience over the movie launch at the theToronto film festival. This is not the first time that their movie is being screened at Toronto. Still, every year, the excitement and stress to perform better peaks up.

Recently, rumors have sparkled that the Coen brothers are having a tough time together and they are planning to separate. But the movie which is directed by the Coen brothers together shattered all the rumors. Personal questions during the interview sessions do not impress the Coen brothers. Recently, a journalist from one of the most reputed film magazines, encountered Joel with a question about their integrity and family? He really got annoyed and responded harshly. The Coen brothers are known to be unrepentant and unapologetic.

When it comes to doing films, the Coen brothers show high professionalism and there is nothing that they can’t do. Their films belong to a wide genre like high flying comedies, revenge tales, and hot romance. They have got picturesque eye, making every frame looks perfect and pleasing to eyes. So, with much expectations and speculations, the Coen brothers are going mark presence at the Toronto.  Once the movie is screened, we will release the first-hand review on our website and the audience get to know, ‘what is it worth?’. Brace yourselves to experience an absolute thriller!

Also participating in the festival will be new work from Michael Moore (Capitalism: A Love Story) and Werner Herzog (Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans).